Monthly Archives: February 2012

Interview: Elise Costa, pop culture expert

Élise Costa has the coolest job ever. She is a pop culture expert.

“Awesome! And how does that pay the bills?”, you may ask.

Well, Élise  works as freelance writer, enabling several French media (mainly websites) to take advantage of her expertise when it comes to pop culture. She likes to analyze frivolous subjects with a serious method – she could probably write a thesis about Lindsay Lohan’s meltdowns or Britney Spears’s mishaps (instead, she studied law at university). She has encyclopedic knowledge of American culture, whether it be TV shows, books, films, and of course, music. Sometimes, she publishes glimpses of her talented pieces of writing on her blog.

In May 2010, she published a book about Britney Spears, entitled Comment je n’ai pas rencontre Britney Spears, which you could translate by How I did not meet Britney Spears. She wrote it after she took a road trip following Britney Spears’s footsteps, from Louisiana – where Britney grew up – to Los Angeles, where Élise saw her live for the first time.

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Poll : Which of these memes do you feel reflects your personality best?

In case you’re not really meme savvy, here is a little memo about which meme is which:

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We want YOUR! private data

The public seems to have grown increasingly wary of online privacy issues. But are people aware that the greatest threat to their privacy may be coming from their own government?

At some point during Wikileaks’ last press conference, on December 1st 2011 at City University London, Julian Assange asked the audience: “Who here has an Iphone? Who here has a Blackberry? Who uses Gmail?” Seeing many hands raising, he announced: “You’re all screwed.” That prediction was met with a few chuckles by the audience. But pessimistic as he may seem, Julian Assange is probably right. It is very likely that we are indeed all screwed.

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Review: The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo

When the American version of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo came out in December 2011, many people (including Neils Arden Oplev, who directed the first adaptation of the book) commented on how David Fincher’s version was useless. Some felt that it demonstrated Hollywood’s need to assert its supremacy by throwing a $90 million remake in the field while the 2009 Swedish version was perfectly fine.


Truth is, the combination between Fincher’s style and the book’s plot is a match made in heaven and it would have been a pity not to let it unfold. Dear Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, welcome to the pantheon of pop culture. It feels as if you always belonged here.

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